10th Feb2015

La Flama Blanca

by Michael Chandler

La Flama Blanca Evo X Michael Chandler CAMautoMag

If you’re familiar with RallySport Direct, then you’ve undoubtedly seen this car.  If you think that this is the company’s car and I had to twist a bunch of arms to be able to take pictures of it, then you’d be wrong.  All I had to do was ask Dallin Felton, because he’s the guy who drives it and has been molding it into what you see here.

La Flama Blanca Evo X Michael Chandler CAMautoMag-2

Dallin is a regular guy, just like any of us.  The biggest difference is that he happens to work for RallySport Direct, whereas we do not.  That, and he has a history of building some awesome cars.  He had a Daytona Violet M3 and a Voltex Evo VIII, so having him take the reigns of the Evo X project wasn’t that huge of a stretch or risk.

La Flama Blanca Evo X Michael Chandler CAMautoMag-7

White is the color of choice for the Evo, as it is for the rest of the RSD fleet; however, this one is accented not with blue, gray and pink like the rest of the cars.  It’s strictly white and red, aside from the windshield banner of course.  For everyday use the car rolls on a set of 18×10.5 Volk Racing TE37RTs, covered by a set of Bridgestone Potenza RE760’s.  The Potenza’s measure in at a healthy 275/35.  Behind the red Volks you see the factory red Brembo brake calipers and the Stoptech slotted rotors they clamp down on.  The slotted rotors are part of Stoptech’s Sport Kit which comprises of the slotted rotors (front and rear), stainless steel brake lines and their Street Performance brake pads.

La Flama Blanca Evo X Michael Chandler CAMautoMag-3

The car has an aggressive stance, but not crazy like a Bond villain.  The Ohlins Road and Track coilovers allow for the height adjustment, while a lengthy list of Whiteline components (ball socket end links, 27mm sway bars, control arm bushings and rear control arms, and roll kit) round out the rest of the suspension set up.  Why the high dollar coilovers and half the Whiteline catalog?  Because La Flama Blanca goes and gets it on the autocross course in the Street Mod class.  That’s also why there’s a set of 18×10 Advan RZ’s with Hoosier A6s sitting in the garage.

La Flama Blanca Evo X Michael Chandler CAMautoMag-6

There is a healthy amount of APR Performance products on the car.  From the front splitter to the big GTC-300 wing.

La Flama Blanca Evo X Michael Chandler CAMautoMag-5

Even the Vortex Generator is an APR piece!  The short antennae is from Cusco, and calling it short is very generous.

La Flama Blanca Evo X Michael Chandler CAMautoMag-4

There’s no massive diffuser, or uber rare bumper on the back of the car.  It’s almost entirely factory save for the APR spoiler, a La Flama Blanca decal, and the tip of a Tomei Titanium cat-back exhaust.  Ahead of that is a Tomei test pipe and Big Mouth down pipe.  There’s also a Tomei upper intercooler pipe made of Titanium.  Aside from the shiny pipe and the TurboSmart Dual Port blow off valve, there’s nothing screaming performance about the car.  The AMS front lower motor mount and shifter bushings are hidden down under the motor, and the Exedy twin plate clutch is a piece that never sees the light of day.  Even the interior is deceivingly pedestrian, save for the AEM UEGO, AccessPORT V3, Fat Perrin shift knob.

All of that go fast stuff you don’t see, or don’t notice because you’re used to seeing EVERY Evo X with parts like that, adds up.  The numbers they add to are 293 horsepower to the wheels and 289 lb/ft of torque.  That ain’t bad, but it’s also subject to change.  If you owned a company that sells parts for a living, wouldn’t you want to throw a bigger intercooler or turbo or cams or whatever else suits your fancy at your shop car?  Stick around.

Words and photos by Michael Chandler
*Article and Photos are copyright of CAMautoMag.Com and their respective owners.

 

17th Oct2013

Reader’s Ride: Randy Reed’s v7 WRX STi

by Michael Chandler

Randy Reed v7 WRX-4

We’ve known for years that the home markets for certain manufacturers have been getting far cooler things than we get here in the land of freedom and bald eagles and deep fried bacon.  But what if you, between pieces of said bacon, decided you wanted one of those not available rides?  For a while, you did nothing but deep fry more bacon and be content with what you had.  Randy Reed of Greensboro, NC did not do that.  He wanted a bug-eye STi, so he made one.

Randy Reed v7 WRX-1

He slapped a JDM v7 front end on, and a front lip as well.  The headlights were upgraded with a Morimoto projector HID kit, so as to see better.  ChargeSpeed air ducts replaced the fog lights and a pair of carbon fiber STi side markers were popped in.  The 4.5″ carbon fiber hood scoop brings in much more air and the occasional bird.  Out back a wingless trunk from a 2.5RS was painted matte black, fitted with a STi badge, then installed.  Keeping flying debris in check are a set of Rally Armor mudflaps.

Ahead of those mudflaps are a set of 18×10 Rota SVNs wrapped in Nexen rubber.  Well, most of the time they’re there.  With winter approaching Randy picked up a set of Enkei Evo 6s.  Yes, they have winter in North Carolina.  Yeah, I was surprised too!

The suspension and brakes on this bug-eye are pretty straightforward: ISC N1 coilovers with camber plates and STi brakes and hubs.

Randy Reed v7 WRX-3

Inside is pretty simple as well.  Full USDM STi interior, JDM floor mats, SPT boost gauge and a Blitz turbo timer.  He sticker bombed the dash insert around the stereo, and he chucked the OEM head unit for a pop out unit with a 7″ screen.  When he’s not changing radio stations, he’s changing gears via the short throw shifter toped by a Blox neochrome shift knob.

Randy Reed v7 WRX-2

And now on to the good stuff!  Here is the V7 STi motor, sitting comfortably in it’s natural habitat.  For those unfamiliar, it’s a 2 liter motor with forged internals from the factory and a bigger turbo.  In this case it’s a VF30 to go with the bigger top mount intercooler.  Getting fuel to this home market masterpiece are a set of 750cc injectors.  Getting the exhaust gasses away from the motor are a 4″ bellmouth down pipe feeding into a DC Sports exhaust.  Sitting almost out of sight is a Grimmspeed 3 port boost solenoid.  The car received an open source tune via a Tactrix setup and put down a very healthy 307whp and 300lb/ft.

Making that power useful is the drivetrain, which received its fair share of upgrades.  A USDM six speed transmission pulled from a 2005 STi was fitted with the two liter starter and works like a dream.  A Clutch Masters stage 2 competition clutch and an Exedy lightweight flywheel were thrown into the mix for added driving pleasure.  Because a transmission swap in a Subaru isn’t as straightforward as it seems, the axles have been swapped out for a set from The Driveshaft Shop and a R-180 rear end had to be installed as well.

Randy Reed’s STi sits as a testament to what a motivated man can do when he wants something you can’t just run out and buy.

Want to see your car on here?  Send us some decent photos and a list of the modifications and we’ll get something going!

Words by Michael Chandler, Photos by Randy Reed.

*Article and Photos are copyright of CAMAutoMag.Com and their respective owners.

 

07th Nov2011

One of a Kind: Mitsubishi Galant

by Michael Chandler

If you ask most people what kind of Mitsubishi they would like you’ll hear a lot of Evolution and Eclipse responses, and a few Galant VR4 responses. You’ll get a few Starion responses, but that’s neither here nor there. The reason you’ll only get a few Galant VR4 responses is because they only sent around 3000 of the AWD turbocharged sedans to North America and because of that only the hardcore Mitsu fan boys and rally geeks know about them. This is not a turbocharged AWD rally special. This Galant is a lot cooler.

 

We’ve known of Broderick, the owner of this daily driven Galant, for a little bit. We’ve known his car longer. For a while this was unofficially the first 3.5L swapped Galant in the country. That made it special. The fact that it’s now packing a 3.9L stroker motor puts it up there with the AWD Galants.

The 3.9L 6G7X motor is all self built. A set of 1mm overbore 6G75 pistons are pumped by stock, forged 6G74 connecting rods attached to a stock 6G75 forged crankshaft. JE file to fit rings hug the pistons and ACL bearings keep everything moving smoothly. All that is stuffed into a .010 decked block, topped with ported and polished and shaved 6G75 non-MIVEC cylinder heads filled with stock 6G75 non-MIVEC camshafts topped with Fidanza adjustable cam gears. ARP main studs keep everything together.

A custom 3.5 inch short ram intake feeds air into a 90mm throttle body lifted from an Infiniti Q45. That is bolted to a 90mm Xcessive Manufacturing surge tank manifold with a port matched lower intake manifold. The fresh air is mixed with 91 octane; which finds it way to the combustion chamber through AeroQuip Starlite -6AN fuel lines, an Aeromotive fuel pressure regulator and Disturbing Motorsports billet -6AN fuel rails. It is ignited by a spark provided 8.5mm Magnacore spark plug wires via an 11.5 pound Braille daily use battery. The spent gasses exit through self made long tube headers, with 1 7/8 inch primaries, and a modified Greddy Ti-C cat back exhaust intended for a 3rd generation Eclipse.

The whole one off motor is held in a tucked and shaved engine bay (which Broderick did himself) by Prothane solid engine mounts. Untuned it put down 241 wheel horsepower and 239 lb/ft of torque.

 

An engine is useless if it can’t put the power down, and this thing can. A SPEC stage 2 carbon kevlar full face clutch and Fidanza 9 pound flywheel (held together by ARP flywheel bolts) transfer the power to the wheels via a 2003 Dodge Stratus R/T manual transaxle. A Megan short shifter connects the USDM trans to the JDM cabin (complete with a Greddy counterweight shift knob!), and Zaklee shifter base bushings and under hood shifter bushings keep the gear changes crisp.

The power physically contacts the ground through whatever rubber is wrapped around the big 18×9.5 Rota Torque wheels. Behind those split five spoke wheels are some Stoptech slotted rotors… For an Evo 8. That seems a little weird, but those calipers are the OEM Brembo Evo 8 units stuffed with PFC carbon metallic pads up front and Axxis pads in the rear. Technafit braided lines move the fluid that provides the squeeze.

 

The car sits very nicely. This stance comes courtesy of a set of KSport Kontrol Pro coilovers. It also handles very nicely thanks to said coilovers and a Suspension Techniques 24mm rear sway bar with Kartboy end links intended for use on a WRX STi front sway bar. The end links for the front sway bar are custom adjustable units, as is the rear tie bar. A Carbing front strut tower bar provides some stiffness in the front, along with some more under hood bling.

 

Outside are a lot of JDM and other assorted goodies. A Pre-facelift JDM front bumper and grill join with JDM headlights and a Monster FRP hood to create a face that looks all sorts of scary when it’s bearing down on you. A trunk spoiler from an M3, along with some carbon fiber trunk garnishments and JDM 3rd generation tail lights keep the rear end looking good as it pulls away. Apexcone 6000k HID’s light the way, and Redline hood struts keep the hood from falling on Broderick or anyone else who’s poking around under it.

 

The cabin is rather straightforward. A dry carbon fiber dash bezel, and regular carbon fiber shifter and center dash bezels add a bit of flare while AEM digital water temperature and oil pressure gauges and UEGO wideband display all pertinent information one would need.

When you ask people what kind of Mitsubishi they’d like, you probably won’t hear a lot of Galant answers but maybe this car will change that.


Words and photos by Michael Chandler, Video by Trent Bray

 

*Article, Video, and Photos are copyright of CAMAutoMag.Com and their respective owners. Images and words may not be re-posted, re-distributed, modified, or copied without expressed written consent from CAMAutoMag.Com